ideal lifting equipment for the lifting industry such as rigging hardware, electric hoists, quality lashing equipment, lifting slings, high quality manual hosts, chain blocks, lever hoists, manual hoist
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We supply direct to market, to resellers and to the mining sectors through our affiliated companies. For more information contact us.
ideal lifting equipment for the lifting industry such as rigging hardware, electric hoists, quality lashing equipment, lifting slings, high quality manual hosts, chain blocks, lever hoists, manual hoist
Lifting and Webbing Solutions
For Resellers
ideal lifting equipment for the lifting industry such as rigging hardware, electric hoists, quality lashing equipment, lifting slings, high quality manual hosts, chain blocks, lever hoists, manual hoist
Webbing Slings
Direct to Market
ideal lifting equipment for the lifting industry such as rigging hardware, electric hoists, quality lashing equipment, lifting slings, high quality manual hosts, chain blocks, lever hoists, manual hoist
Wire Rope Solutions
Direct to Market & Resellers
ideal lifting equipment for the lifting industry such as rigging hardware, electric hoists, quality lashing equipment, lifting slings, high quality manual hosts, chain blocks, lever hoists, manual hoist
Lifting and Webbing
Mining Sector

PRODUCTS WE SUPPLY

Sales, maintenance & inspection of lifting equipment service by our affiliated companies. Please select a product below for more:
ideal lifting equipment for the lifting industry such as rigging hardware, electric hoists, quality lashing equipment, lifting slings, high quality manual hosts, chain blocks, lever hoists, manual hoist
Rigging Hardware
Direct, Resellers & Mining
ideal lifting equipment for the lifting industry such as rigging hardware, electric hoists, quality lashing equipment, lifting slings, high quality manual hosts, chain blocks, lever hoists, manual hoist
Electric Hoists
Direct, Resellers & Mining
ideal lifting equipment for the lifting industry such as rigging hardware, electric hoists, quality lashing equipment, lifting slings, high quality manual hosts, chain blocks, lever hoists, manual hoist
Manual Hoists
Direct, Resellers & Mining
ideal lifting equipment for the lifting industry such as rigging hardware, electric hoists, quality lashing equipment, lifting slings, high quality manual hosts, chain blocks, lever hoists, manual hoist
Lifting Slings
Direct, Resellers & Mining
ideal lifting equipment for the lifting industry such as rigging hardware, electric hoists, quality lashing equipment, lifting slings, high quality manual hosts, chain blocks, lever hoists, manual hoist
Lashing Equipment
Direct, Resellers & Mining

Chain slings are known for their durability and they are one of the toughest categories of rigging. Industrial lifting slings that are made up of chain guarantee better performance compared to polyester round slings, nylon web slings, and twin-path slings. Much preferred for their adjustability, chain rigging slings exhibit better temperature tolerance and cut resistance. Notably, the chain is manufactured in various grades. The strength of the rigging chain is indicated in terms of the lifting chain’s grade number and the larger grade number indicates greater chain strength.

Chains numbered as Grade 30 or Grade 40 are often found at hardware stores and they can be used safely for segmenting parking lots, but they are not fit for use in serious lifting operations.

Trucking and transportation companies normally use Grade 70 transport chains to tie down loads, but such tie-down-chains should never be used as rigging applications. Chain slings with grades 80, 100, and 120 can only be used for lifting purposes in industrial settings. This is mainly due to the fact that the metal used to make these slings demonstrates a strong capability to stretch and elongate. This becomes one of the major considerations when annual inspections are conducted to measure chain slings. These days, most rigging chain manufacturers have started focusing on manufacturing grade 100 lifting chains that are stronger yet lighter than grade 80 rigging chains.

Chain slings come in standard form as well as with custom-made fittings that are designed to suit specific conditions. The manufacture of chain slings is governed by industry standards that demand proof-testing and certification of all individual components that are used in the fabrication of rigging chains. Popularly, alloy steel is used to manufacture chain slings that are used for overhead lifting applications. Stringent quality control techniques are applied to 8600 series alloy before it is approved for use in overhead lifting operations. Alloy steel chains demonstrate the appropriate strength, mechanical properties, and chemical content that is required to adhere to the industry standards. The standards require chain slings to have minimum proof-test and elongation values and require chain slings to bear specifications regrading minimum statistical breaking strengths and working load limits.

It is critical to be able to distinguish alloy steel from other popular grades of welded chain and you can identify alloy chain through its hallmark or identification code that normally comes engraved into chain links. Make sure that you do not use chain slings for overhead lifting unless you verify that it is made out of alloy steel.

Safety is of utmost importance when it comes to operating lifting equipment. And without proper safety precautions, you are putting your equipment, your worker and your reputation on the line.Let us look at some of the considerations for the safe use of lifting equipment on site.

1. A trained and qualified operator

The most crucial consideration is to employ a competent operator, one who is suitably trained, adequately qualified and has significant experience to do the job. In fact, all other safety considerations depend on the actions of the qualified, experienced and trained operator. If your lifting equipment is unsuitable for their job, it won’t matter how carefully you address the other safety considerations.

2. Knowledge of lockout & tagout procedures

Lockout procedures are intended to dissipate all energy from a piece of equipment to make it safe for maintenance. Electricity, steam, hydraulic pressure, heat, air pressure and kinetic energy could all be potentially hazardous, and operators should be prepared to lock devices (to prevent them from being turned on) and tag them (to warn other employees to keep the device locked).

3. Pre-operational inspection

You never know what may happen at a job site or with a piece of equipment from day to day, so a pre-operational inspection is required to ensure that everything is in working order. Before operation, the motor, brakes, safety devices, tooling equipment and load lifting mechanisms should all be inspected. A logbook must always be used to document those inspections.

4. Abide by lifting capacities

Workers should not rely on their instincts or experience to determine if a load is too heavy. They should calculate the safe working load and working load limit for the device. Overloaded lifting equipment has the potential to drop materials and injure workers or cause damage to the machinery, the load or facilities. Load testing should be performed along with maintenance checks, so that operators will come to know how many KGs the crane can handle.

5. Know international and site-specific hand signals

Lifting equipment is often used in very noisy, chaotic environments, so knowledge of appropriate hand signals is imperative. Without other options, hand signals may be your only way to communicate vitally important information to your co-workers. This is essential not just from a safety perspective, but it can also help ensure the efficiency of operations.

When working with heavy lifting equipment, anything can go wrong. The load capacity might not match the weight of your products, workers may not have proper training and the equipment itself may be in a state of disrepair.

Any of these issues has the potential to create an unsafe working environment, but all of these are also easily fixable. in addition to providing adequate worker training, scheduling lifting equipment inspections is paramount and will prevent a number of other problems occurring.

1. Checking for damage

The most crucial part of any inspection is finding present damage. If a part is already broken or rusted, it can pose a serious danger to workers who use the equipment. An inspection will ensure that all parts and features are operational and in good working condition. If anything does need repair, you’ll have an outline of exactly what needs to be fixed. Just because the equipment is still working doesn’t mean that everything is in optimal working condition.

2. Proactively replacing aging materials

It’s beneficial to find a problem before it escalates. A good lifting equipment inspection will identify materials that are past their prime and should be replaced, before they break down.

This could save you time and money by avoiding unexpected downtime due to malfunctioning equipment. It can also protect your workers from avoidable injuries by getting ahead of issues before they become a threat to safety.

3. Updating the system to meet changing needs

Sometimes, companies update their strategies and capabilities without thinking about how their current systems will accommodate these changes. If production has gone up at your manufacturing plant or you’re now distributing larger, heavier items, your current equipment may not be up to par. As your processes change, remember to consider the impact this may have on your capital equipment. You may need to update your load capacity, or even need a completely overhauled system to meet new industry standards.

Lifting beams are one of the most common types of below-the-hook lifting devices. They have a simple design comprising of a beam with a single attachment point centered on the top side of the beam for connecting to a crane, hoist, or other lifting machine. Some lifting beams may have two bails to engage 2 crane or hoist hooks. There are usually 2 or more evenly-spaced lifting lugs on the underside of the beam that attach to and support the load via hook or sling.

They are perfect for lighter and shorter span lifts that do not require a lot of headroom. Because there is a single bail attachment on the top for the crane to attach to, it doesn’t require the same amount of headroom that a spreader beam does.

Lifting beams also provide multiple lifting points underneath and can be designed with variable or fixed lifting lugs. This type of adjust-ability means that lifting beams can be utilized in many different applications and for many different types of loads. This adjustable design allows lifting beams to:

There is a safe loading and maneuvering process, with the use of an adjustable lifting beam with two lifting points along with the patented evo automatic lifting hooks, the lifting and maneuvering process of any load is faster and at the same time security is enhanced by maintaining operators at a safe distance from the load during the complete lifting process.

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